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Adaptogens adapt to current substantiation needs

Western research is adapting its study endpoints and designs to better understand the benefits of adaptogenic herbs. 

Blake Ebersole | Mar 01, 2019

Adaptogens are an idea whose time has come, and their story has been developing for millions of years. Life on Earth has always required organisms to adapt to their environments to survive and reproduce.

It’s generally accepted that various forms of stress negatively impact health, and that reducing stress can help support a person’s well-being. In the broadest sense, stress can manifest in many ways—on physical, emotional and mental levels—down to the systemic, cellular and molecular levels. Fatigue, anxiety and depression are symptoms related to poor regulation of neurotransmitters; metabolism and related pathways all are either symptoms, causes or mitigating factors of stress and compromised health.

In a world where every nutrition and health idea draws controversy, most agree that foods can reduce stress. Not many Twitter or Facebook arguments contend that chocolate and wine don’t relieve stress.

Yet, the term “adaptogenic” is not widely accepted in the medical or scientific lexicon. The term has been hidden in the scientific literature after its coining by 1960s-era Russian researchers studying herbs including Rhodiola rosea and Eleutherococcus senticosus (eleuthero). Adaptogens were originally defined as “substances that increase resistance to a broad spectrum of harmful factors (stressors) of different physical, chemical and biological natures.”1 More recently, the definition has adapted to include “metabolic regulators, which increase the ability of an organism to adapt to environmental factors.”

One challenge to the mainstream acceptance of adaptogens in the West is their roots in Eastern philosophy. The cyclical nature of life, and the central ideas of homeostasis, often conflict with a predominant Western version of rational, reductionist thought that seeks to apply linear thinking to nonlinear problems, jamming various shapes of pegs into a specific size of square hole like a stubborn 2-year-old.

Adaptogenic activity is not confined to a single pathway, but involves subtle interactions with multiple biochemical pathways. Adaptogenic foods and herbs are not single-compound drugs, but are complex mixtures of hundreds or thousands of potentially bioactive compounds that together work in ways impossible to fully understand. Adaptogens work differently in different people at different times. As a result, the effects of adaptogens are often difficult to study and prove using typical clinical trial designs considered “gold standard” in Western-based drug research.

The Western scientific process is limited by several factors, including its objective to produce a simple pass/fail answer based on statistical probability (a.k.a., P<0.05) and the limitations of currently available measurement tools. The use and acceptance of adaptogens in the West is fraught with this conflict. It seems that the only way to make sense is to adapt and adopt the best of both East and West.

Across the spectrum of traditional use and modern scientific research, adaptogenic herbs such as rhodiola, eleuthero, ginseng (both Asian and American species), ashwagandha, astragalus, holy basil and bacopa have shown positive, repeatable effects—even in multiple forms, with effects repeated by multiple research groups. Looking broader, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant ingredients like docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), turmeric and plant polyphenols have displayed an ability to support the body’s resistance to oxidative and cellular stress, which often manifest as improving the body’s resilience to stress.

Preclinical studies have repeatedly found that treatments with adaptogenic properties (which in addition to herbs and foods, also includes many drugs like antidepressants and anti-inflammatories) alter the “tipping point” where adaptive processes turn maladaptive in the presence of stress. In the presence of stressors, adaptogens often exhibit neuroprotective, anti-fatigue, anti-depressant, immunosupportive, anxiolytic and central nervous system (CNS) stimulant activity.2 Many studies have found adaptogenic foods and herbs to exert a balancing effect on neurotransmitter receptors, including serotonin and dopamine, which may be central to their effects.1

Adaptogens are shown to support the regulation of homeostasis by acting on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and regulating key mediators of stress response, such as heat shock protein, stress-activated JNK1, neuropeptide Y, antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide.2 Many adaptogens are associated with genetic mediating effects and longevity signaling pathways. Beyond mechanism of action, adaptogens are known to impact clinical endpoints related to cognitive function, the immune system and physical performance.

It stands to reason that natural products supported by a long history of safe and traditional use, particularly today as part of products formulated by scientists and medical experts, which are validated in well-designed, randomized, controlled human clinical trials, should be accepted within the set of options available for people to build resistance to stress.

Even the most Westernized of medical practices have begun to offer stress-relieving services like meditation and aromatherapy. It is common sense for anyone who has witnessed the efficacy of herbs to relax and recover.

In the face of the actual evidence, the “evidence-based” mongers, who disregard anything that’s not proven in the same way as a modern drug, appear as brazenly ignorant.

Luckily, research efforts have greatly accelerated in places like Europe, India and China, where thousands of peer-reviewed study publications overwhelmingly support the ability of numerous natural products and foods to support the body’s ability to adapt and resist the effects of stress.

While mainstream medicine is still reluctant about adaptogens, many peer-reviewed academic journals listed on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) database (Medline) accept the term “adaptogenic” as a primary descriptor for these types of natural products—372 published studies, based on a recent search.

Rhodiola, or “golden root,” considered by many to be the “true original” adaptogen, has been the subject of several recent studies. Two 2018 studies illustrated the effects of rhodiola on burnout3 and neuronal plasticity4 in humans.

These studies illustrate opportunities for clinical researchers to advance their design for studying adaptogens based on evolving knowledge. One of the lessons is to include enough of the right kind of subjects—including populations who are not simply selected at random, but whose medical history, lifestyles and baseline characteristics are better understood and controlled within the study.

Another lesson applied in recent research is the adoption of more sensitive and relevant clinical endpoints in real-world settings. The evolution of virtual clinical trials (VCTs) using observational study designs and modern technology (like wearables) may provide better ways to study and substantiate the effects of adaptogens.

It’s likely that future research on adaptogens will learn from past lessons. Because as science has revealed, we need to adapt to new knowledge, including the fact that there exist many other shapes of pegs than square.

Blake Ebersole has led several botanical quality initiatives and formed collaborations with dozens of universities and research centers. As president of NaturPro Scientific , Ebersole established quality compliance and product development services for supplements and ingredients such as ID Verified™. Follow him on Twitter at @NaturalBlake.

This article was first published in Natural Products Insider, March 2019

References:

1. Panossian A. “Understanding adaptogenic activity: specificity of the pharmacological action of adaptogens and other phytochemicals.” Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2017 Aug;1401(1):49-64. DOI: 10.1111/nyas.13399.

2. Panossian A, Seo E, Efferth T. “Novel molecular mechanisms for the adaptogenic effects of herbal extracts on isolated brain cells using systems biology.” Phytomedicine. 2018 Nov 15;50:257-284. DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2018.09.204.

3. Ross S. “Burnout: A Multicenter Exploratory Clinical Trial With a Proprietary Extract of Rhodiola rosea in Patients With Burnout Syndrome.” Holist Nurs Pract. 2018 Nov/Dec;32(6):336-339. DOi: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000299.

4. Concerto C et al. “Exploring the effect of adaptogenic Rhodiola Rosea extract on neuroplasticity in humans.” Complement Ther Med. 2018 Dec;41:141-146. DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2018.09.013.

Cannabis Consultants

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

NaturPro Scientific stands out as consultants who work for our clients.

Our history: We have more than 30 years experience in developing the scientific aspects of botanical products to support human health. So when we started to work on cannabis, hemp and CBD products in 2013, it was second nature.

There are a lot of things to consider when developing cannabis products or hiring a consultant.

  1. Whether your partners understand regulations, compliance and quality assurance, and how to balance these with business. We help you meet the legal requirements and regulations, without breaking the bank.
  2. Scientific expertise and experience across all the function platforms of health product businesses. Whether it’s the science, regulations, communications, validation or due diligence needed, you need someone who’s going to share expert opinions with honesty and transparency.
  3. Inside knowledge of industry standards through active participation on committees of industry standards-setting organizations like American Herbal Products Association, ASTM International and the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. We have a solid reputation in the food, supplement, CBD and cannabis  industry as someone you can trust.
  4. Experience consulting and working efficiently with companies of all sizes and types. Our clients ultimately value our knowledge of both the ideal and the practical, and helping to bridge the gap between efficiently and cost effectively.

Contact us today to learn more about how our expert consultants can help drive your cannabis firm and products to groundbreaking innovation, compliance and success.

——————-

Cannabis Consultants and Experts in Innovation, Product Development and Regulatory Compliance

——————-

Quick Links:

——————–

 

NaturPro Scientific is a recognized leader in regulatory compliance, GMP and quality assurance on CBD, cannabis, botanical drugs, dietary supplements and foods.

What are Good Manufacturing Practices?  Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) ensures products are consistently produced and controlled to the quality standards and conform to all applicable regulatory requirements.  Good Manufacturing Practices are fundamental to any manufacturing industry and are often required to be implemented in plants and factories by national governments.  Our team of experts can assist you with the development and evaluation of GMP programs  for cannabis, marijuana, hemp and CBD products.

We help you to train qualified staff, get in-depth and correct understanding of standards, and establish comprehensive management systems.

Audits for GMP and Quality Assurance

Here are some of the services we offer for cannabis compliance:

  • Audits
    • Preliminary Gap Analysis
    • Facility GMP pre-audits
    • Internal Audits
    • Third-Party Audits
    • CAPA Audits
  • Quality Management
  • Materials Testing
  • Process Approvals
  • Documentation and SOP
    1. Quality Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
    3. Document Control
    4. Traceability & Recall
      1. Formula Records
      2. Batch Records
      3. Certificates of Analysis
    5. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
    6. Supplier Qualification
    7. Preventive Controls
    8. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    9. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)
    10. Quality Issue Investigation and Resolution
  • Training and Hiring
  • Investor Due Diligence

cannabis-consultants-extraction-GMP

NaturPro Scientific are cannabis consultants for extraction and GMP

NaturPro works closely with our clients to provide the most cost effective way to achieve GMP certification and an edge in the market.

The 4 main benefits of our audits (among many) include:

  1. Understanding where you are may not meet regulatory requirements
  2. Provide reviews and recommendations from a fresh perspective
  3. Train your staff on dealing with regulatory audits
  4. Reduce the risk of a food safety issue or costly product recall.

Audits are an integral part of the licensing and ongoing regulatory compliance process for cannabis, marijuana and CBD products. Cannabis audits can be rigorous, and are seen as a true ‘stress test’ on your quality system.

Pre-License Audits
Prior to issuing a license (e.g.,  Cultivation, Processor, Retail), regulators may require demonstration  compliance with the relevant cannabis regulation, and to ensure implementation of critical regulatory requirements such as physical security requirements, recordkeeping and good production practices. Licensed cannabis firms are required to demonstrate regulatory compliance at these audits in order to achieve (and maintain) their license.

Introductory Audits

An introductory audit may be scheduled after the pre-licensing audit, when the licensee is ready to start production. NaturPro Scientific is often hired to participate in and support our clients before, during and after regulatory audits. This audit is conducted to verify compliance against regulations in addition to inventory control/activities.

GMP Audit 
This type of audit assesses compliance against established Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) guidelines. Our experts have extensive experience with GMP audits to assist cultivators and processors  identify gaps against the regulations/standards, and putting appropriate corrective and preventative actions in place.

Quality Assurance
NaturPro has FDA-trained food safety experts (PCQI) and chemists on staff, and we are often called to perform duties of a Quality Manager for our clients. We handle and interpret lab testing, support supply chain and supplier qualification based on best practices for cannabis and botanical drugs.

 

Standard operating procedures (SOP) for cultivation, processing and testing operations can be challenging. NaturPro Scientific’s experience with SOP helps you get to your desired outcome quickly and efficiently.

Our experience in cannabis includes:

  • Currently serve on ASTM International and American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committees
  • Supported the development of operating standards and wrote standard operating procedures (SOP) for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for cannabis standards‐setting organization, currently under review by ASTM International
  • Currently serve as regulatory and quality assurance consultant for hemp industry and trade organizations
  • Founding member of new self regulatory organization for hemp and CBD products
  • Coordinated initial R&D, production, quality assurance and regulatory affairs for a cannabis startup with operations in Washington, Colorado and Nevada
  • Assisted in development of cannabis license applications in New York, Florida, California, Colorado and Louisiana
  • Established analytical testing standards and guidelines for potency and purity of cannabis products
  • Audited cannabis analytical laboratory data according to ISO 17025 standards
  • Developed in‐house formulas, materials lists, manufacturing processes, manufacturing records and operational guidelines for cannabis extract and finished product production
  • Developed R&D for and commercial processes for large‐scale extraction and purification of cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis

CBD Procedures and SOP (Standard Operating Procedures) are the central part of operations of any cultivation, extraction, processing, packaging or testing business. Startups who invest in solid standard operating procedures (SOP) find themselves several steps ahead, running efficiently, with well-trained staff, and don’t suffer any costly mistakes.

CBD SOP are required by each state where cannabis, marijuana or hemp are regulated.

Any cannabis, hemp, medical or adult-use (recreational) marijuana product is subject to a number of controls, from seed to shelf. NaturPro Scientific has supported a number of clients in the aim of providing safe, effective cannabis and hemp products to support human health.


  1. Cultivation or Processing
    1. Management
    2. Applicable Regulations
    3. Operations
    4. Training & Safety
    5. Hygiene
    6. Sanitation & Cleaning
    7. Farm or Facility
    8. Equipment
    9. Seeds and Propagation Materials
    10. Agricultural Inputs
    11. Pre-harvest practices
    12. Harvesting
    13. Post-harvest practices
    14. Drying & Milling
    15. Sampling
    16. Testing (Potency, purity, cannabinoids, microbiology, heavy metals, pesticides)
    17. Waste Management
  2. Quality Management Systems
    1. Product Quality Policy/Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
      1. Document Control
      2. Formula Records
      3. Batch Records
      4. Certificates of Analysis
    3. Traceability & Recall
    4. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
      3. Supplier Qualification
      4. Intentional Adulteration
      5. Preventive Controls
    5. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    6. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)



CBD Quality Consultants and Experts 

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

In a world where everyone claims to be an expert, NaturPro Scientific stands out as consultants who work for our clients.

Our history: We have more than 30 years experience in developing the scientific aspects of botanical products to support human health. So when we started to work on cannabis, hemp and CBD products in 2013, it was second nature.

Our experience: There are a lot of things to consider when developing cannabis products or hiring a consultant.

First, is whether your partners understand regulations, compliance and quality assurance, and how to balance these with business. We help you meet the legal requirements and regulations, without breaking the bank.

Second, is scientific expertise and experience across all the function platforms of health product businesses. Whether it’s the science, regulations, communications, validation or due diligence needed, you need someone who’s going to share expert opinions with honesty and transparency.

Third, is inside knowledge of industry standards through active participation on committees of industry standards-setting organizations like American Herbal Products Association, ASTM International and the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. We have a solid reputation in the food, supplement, CBD and cannabis  industry as someone you can trust.

Fourth — is experience consulting and working efficiently with companies of all sizes and types. Our clients ultimately value our knowledge of both the ideal and the practical, and helping to bridge the gap between efficiently and cost effectively.

Contact us today to learn more about how our expert consultants can help drive your cannabis firm and products to groundbreaking innovation, compliance and success.

——————-

CBD Quality Consultants and Experts Specializing in Innovation and Product Development and Regulatory Compliance

——————-

Quick Links:

——————–

 

NaturPro Scientific is a recognized leader in audits, GMP and quality assurance on CBD, cannabis, botanical drugs, dietary supplements and foods.

What are Good Manufacturing Practices?  Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) ensures products are consistently produced and controlled to the quality standards and conform to all applicable regulatory requirements.  Good Manufacturing Practices are fundamental to any manufacturing industry and are often required to be implemented in plants and factories by national governments.  Our team of experts can assist you with the development and evaluation of GMP programs  for cannabis, marijuana, hemp and CBD products.

We help you to train qualified staff, get in-depth and correct understanding of standards, and establish comprehensive management systems.

CBD Auditors, GMP and Quality Assurance

Here are some of the services we offer for cannabis compliance:

  • Audits
    • Preliminary Gap Analysis
    • Facility GMP pre-audits
    • Internal Audits
    • Third-Party Audits
    • CAPA Audits
  • Quality Management
  • Materials Testing
  • Process Approvals
  • Documentation and SOP
    1. Quality Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
    3. Document Control
    4. Traceability & Recall
      1. Formula Records
      2. Batch Records
      3. Certificates of Analysis
    5. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
    6. Supplier Qualification
    7. Preventive Controls
    8. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    9. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)
    10. Quality Issue Investigation and Resolution
  • Training and Hiring
  • Investor Due Diligence

cannabis-consultants-extraction-GMP

NaturPro Scientific are cannabis consultants for extraction and GMP

NaturPro works closely with our clients to provide the most cost effective way to achieve GMP certification and an edge in the market.

The 4 main benefits of our audits (among many) include:

  1. Understanding where you are may not meet regulatory requirements
  2. Provide reviews and recommendations from a fresh perspective
  3. Train your staff on dealing with regulatory audits
  4. Reduce the risk of a food safety issue or costly product recall.

Audits are an integral part of the licensing and ongoing regulatory compliance process for cannabis, marijuana and CBD products. Cannabis audits can be rigorous, and are seen as a true ‘stress test’ on your quality system.

Pre-License Audits
Prior to issuing a license (e.g.,  Cultivation, Processor, Retail), regulators may require demonstration  compliance with the relevant cannabis regulation, and to ensure implementation of critical regulatory requirements such as physical security requirements, recordkeeping and good production practices. Licensed cannabis firms are required to demonstrate regulatory compliance at these audits in order to achieve (and maintain) their license.

Introductory Audits

An introductory audit may be scheduled after the pre-licensing audit, when the licensee is ready to start production. NaturPro Scientific is often hired to participate in and support our clients before, during and after regulatory audits. This audit is conducted to verify compliance against regulations in addition to inventory control/activities.

GMP Audit 
This type of audit assesses compliance against established Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) guidelines. Our experts have extensive experience with GMP audits to assist cultivators and processors  identify gaps against the regulations/standards, and putting appropriate corrective and preventative actions in place.

Quality Assurance
NaturPro has FDA-trained food safety experts (PCQI) and chemists on staff, and we are often called to perform duties of a Quality Manager for our clients. We handle and interpret lab testing, support supply chain and supplier qualification based on best practices for cannabis and botanical drugs.

 

Standard operating procedures (SOP) for CBD processing operations can be challenging. NaturPro Scientific’s experience with SOP helps you get to your desired outcome quickly and efficiently.

Our experience in cannabis includes:

  • Currently serve on ASTM International and American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committees
  • Supported the development of operating standards and wrote standard operating procedures (SOP) for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for cannabis standards‐setting organization, currently under review by ASTM International
  • Currently serve as regulatory and quality assurance consultant for hemp industry and trade organizations
  • Founding member of new self regulatory organization for hemp and CBD products
  • Coordinated initial R&D, production, quality assurance and regulatory affairs for a cannabis startup with operations in Washington, Colorado and Nevada
  • Assisted in development of cannabis license applications in New York, Florida, California, Colorado and Louisiana
  • Established analytical testing standards and guidelines for potency and purity of cannabis products
  • Audited cannabis analytical laboratory data according to ISO 17025 standards
  • Developed in‐house formulas, materials lists, manufacturing processes, manufacturing records and operational guidelines for cannabis extract and finished product production
  • Developed R&D for and commercial processes for large‐scale extraction and purification of cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis

CBD Procedures and SOP (Standard Operating Procedures) are the central part of operations of any cultivation, extraction, processing, packaging or testing business. Startups who invest in solid standard operating procedures (SOP) find themselves several steps ahead, running efficiently, with well-trained staff, and don’t suffer any costly mistakes.

CBD SOP are required by each state where cannabis, marijuana or hemp are regulated.

Any cannabis, hemp, medical or adult-use (recreational) marijuana product is subject to a number of controls, from seed to shelf. NaturPro Scientific has supported a number of clients in the aim of providing safe, effective cannabis and hemp products to support human health.


  1. Cultivation or Processing
    1. Management
    2. Applicable Regulations
    3. Operations
    4. Training & Safety
    5. Hygiene
    6. Sanitation & Cleaning
    7. Farm or Facility
    8. Equipment
    9. Seeds and Propagation Materials
    10. Agricultural Inputs
    11. Pre-harvest practices
    12. Harvesting
    13. Post-harvest practices
    14. Drying & Milling
    15. Sampling
    16. Testing (Potency, purity, cannabinoids, microbiology, heavy metals, pesticides)
    17. Waste Management
  2. Quality Management Systems
    1. Product Quality Policy/Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
      1. Document Control
      2. Formula Records
      3. Batch Records
      4. Certificates of Analysis
    3. Traceability & Recall
    4. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
      3. Supplier Qualification
      4. Intentional Adulteration
      5. Preventive Controls
    5. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    6. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)



Cannabis Quality Consultants

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

In a world where everyone claims to be an expert, NaturPro Scientific stands out as consultants who work for our clients.

Our history. We have more than 30 years experience in developing the scientific aspects of botanical products to support human health. So when we started to work on cannabis, hemp and CBD products in 2013, it was second nature.

Our experience: There are a lot of things to consider when developing cannabis products or hiring a consultant.

First, is whether your partners understand regulations, compliance and quality assurance, and how to balance these with business. We help you meet the legal requirements and regulations, without breaking the bank.

Second, is scientific expertise and experience across all the function platforms of health product businesses. Whether it’s the science, regulations, communications, validation or due diligence needed, you need someone who’s going to share expert opinions with honesty and transparency.

Third, is inside knowledge of industry standards through active participation on committees of industry standards-setting organizations like American Herbal Products Association, ASTM International and the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. We have a solid reputation in the food, supplement and cannabis  industry as someone you can trust.

Fourth — is experience consulting and working efficiently with companies of all sizes and types. Our clients ultimately value our knowledge of both the ideal and the practical, and helping to bridge the gap between efficiently and cost effectively.

Contact us today to learn more about how our expert consultants can help drive your cannabis firm and products to groundbreaking innovation, compliance and success.

——————-

Cannabis Quality Consultants Specializing in Innovation and Product Development and Regulatory Compliance

——————-

Quick Links:

——————–

 

NaturPro Scientific is a recognized leader in audits, GMP and quality assurance on cannabis, botanical drugs, dietary supplements and foods.

What are Good Manufacturing Practices?  Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) ensures products are consistently produced and controlled to the quality standards and conform to all applicable regulatory requirements.  Good Manufacturing Practices are fundamental to any manufacturing industry and are often required to be implemented in plants and factories by national governments.  Our team of experts can assist you with the development and evaluation of GMP programs  for cannabis, marijuana, hemp and CBD products.

We help you to train qualified staff, get in-depth and correct understanding of standards, and establish comprehensive management systems.

CBD and Cannabis Auditors, GMP and Quality Assurance

Here are some of the services we offer for cannabis compliance:

  • Audits
    • Preliminary Gap Analysis
    • Facility GMP pre-audits
    • Internal Audits
    • Third-Party Audits
    • CAPA Audits
  • Quality Management
  • Materials Testing
  • Process Approvals
  • Documentation and SOP
    1. Quality Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
    3. Document Control
    4. Traceability & Recall
      1. Formula Records
      2. Batch Records
      3. Certificates of Analysis
    5. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
    6. Supplier Qualification
    7. Preventive Controls
    8. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    9. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)
    10. Quality Issue Investigation and Resolution
  • Training and Hiring
  • Investor Due Diligence

cannabis-consultants-extraction-GMP

NaturPro Scientific are cannabis consultants for extraction and GMP

NaturPro works closely with our clients to provide the most cost effective way to achieve GMP certification and an edge in the market.

The 4 main benefits of our audits (among many) include:

  1. Understanding where you are may not meet regulatory requirements
  2. Provide reviews and recommendations from a fresh perspective
  3. Train your staff on dealing with regulatory audits
  4. Reduce the risk of a food safety issue or costly product recall.

Audits are an integral part of the licensing and ongoing regulatory compliance process for cannabis, marijuana and CBD products. Cannabis audits can be rigorous, and are seen as a true ‘stress test’ on your quality system.

Pre-License Audits
Prior to issuing a license (e.g.,  Cultivation, Processor, Retail), regulators may require demonstration  compliance with the relevant cannabis regulation, and to ensure implementation of critical regulatory requirements such as physical security requirements, recordkeeping and good production practices. Licensed cannabis firms are required to demonstrate regulatory compliance at these audits in order to achieve (and maintain) their license.

Introductory Audits

An introductory audit may be scheduled after the pre-licensing audit, when the licensee is ready to start production. NaturPro Scientific is often hired to participate in and support our clients before, during and after regulatory audits. This audit is conducted to verify compliance against regulations in addition to inventory control/activities.

GMP Audit 
This type of audit assesses compliance against established Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) guidelines. Our experts have extensive experience with GMP audits to assist cultivators and processors  identify gaps against the regulations/standards, and putting appropriate corrective and preventative actions in place.

Quality Assurance
NaturPro has FDA-trained food safety experts (PCQI) and chemists on staff, and we are often called to perform duties of a Quality Manager for our clients. We handle and interpret lab testing, support supply chain and supplier qualification based on best practices for cannabis and botanical drugs.

 

Standard operating procedures (SOP) for Cannabis operations can be challenging. NaturPro Scientific’s experience with SOP helps you get to your desired outcome quickly and efficiently.

Our experience in cannabis includes:

  • Currently serve on ASTM International and American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committees
  • Supported the development of operating standards and wrote standard operating procedures (SOP) for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for cannabis standards‐setting organization, currently under review by ASTM International
  • Currently serve as regulatory and quality assurance consultant for hemp industry and trade organizations
  • Founding member of new self regulatory organization for hemp and CBD products
  • Coordinated initial R&D, production, quality assurance and regulatory affairs for a cannabis startup with operations in Washington, Colorado and Nevada
  • Assisted in development of cannabis license applications in New York, Florida, California, Colorado and Louisiana
  • Established analytical testing standards and guidelines for potency and purity of cannabis products
  • Audited cannabis analytical laboratory data according to ISO 17025 standards
  • Developed in‐house formulas, materials lists, manufacturing processes, manufacturing records and operational guidelines for cannabis extract and finished product production
  • Developed R&D for and commercial processes for large‐scale extraction and purification of cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis

Cannabis & Hemp Procedures and SOP (Standard Operating Procedures) are the central part of operations of any cultivation, extraction, processing, packaging or testing business. Startups who invest in solid standard operating procedures (SOP) find themselves several steps ahead, running efficiently, with well-trained staff, and don’t suffer any costly mistakes.

Cannabis SOP are required by each state where cannabis, marijuana or hemp are regulated.

Any cannabis, hemp, medical or adult-use (recreational) marijuana product is subject to a number of controls, from seed to shelf. NaturPro Scientific has supported a number of clients in the aim of providing safe, effective cannabis and hemp products to support human health.


  1. Cultivation or Processing
    1. Management
    2. Applicable Regulations
    3. Operations
    4. Training & Safety
    5. Hygiene
    6. Sanitation & Cleaning
    7. Farm or Facility
    8. Equipment
    9. Seeds and Propagation Materials
    10. Agricultural Inputs
    11. Pre-harvest practices
    12. Harvesting
    13. Post-harvest practices
    14. Drying & Milling
    15. Sampling
    16. Testing (Potency, purity, cannabinoids, microbiology, heavy metals, pesticides)
    17. Waste Management
  2. Quality Management Systems
    1. Product Quality Policy/Manual
    2. Recordkeeping
      1. Document Control
      2. Formula Records
      3. Batch Records
      4. Certificates of Analysis
    3. Traceability & Recall
    4. Risk Analysis
      1. Hazard Analysis
      2. Purchasing Criteria & Specifications
      3. Supplier Qualification
      4. Intentional Adulteration
      5. Preventive Controls
    5. Product Approval & Rejection, Material Inspection
    6. Complaints & CAPA (Corrective Actions)



Cannabis and CBD Experts

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

NaturPro Scientific are natural product, cannabis and CBD experts, with over 30 years of experience.  Our experience includes:

  • Currently serve on ASTM International and American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committees
  • Supported the development of operating standards and wrote standard operating procedures (SOP) for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for cannabis standards‐setting organization, currently under review by ASTM International
  • Currently serve as regulatory and quality assurance consultant for hemp industry and trade organizations
  • Founding member of new self regulatory organization for hemp and CBD products
  • Coordinated initial R&D, production, quality assurance and regulatory affairs for a cannabis startup with operations in Washington, Colorado and Nevada
  • Assisted in development of cannabis license applications in New York, Florida, California, Colorado and Louisiana
  • Established analytical testing standards and guidelines for potency and purity of cannabis products
  • Audited cannabis analytical laboratory data according to ISO 17025 standards
  • Developed in‐house formulas, materials lists, manufacturing processes, manufacturing records and operational guidelines for cannabis extract and finished product production
  • Developed R&D for and commercial processes for large‐scale extraction and purification of cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis
  • Developed products with improved dose delivery methods including water soluble and precise cannabinoid ratio products

————-

What do CBD and Cannabis experts do?

We write SOP and provide expert guidance: 

Cannabis & Hemp Procedures and SOP (Standard Operating Procedures) are the central part of operations of any cultivation, extraction, processing, packaging or testing business. Startups who invest in solid standard operating procedures (SOP) find themselves several steps ahead, running efficiently, with well-trained staff, and don’t suffer any costly mistakes. Cannabis SOP are required by each state where cannabis, marijuana or hemp are regulated.

Any cannabis, hemp, medical or adult-use (recreational) marijuana product is subject to a number of controls, from seed to shelf. NaturPro Scientific has supported a number of clients in the aim of providing safe, effective cannabis and hemp products to support human health.

Our services for CBD, cannabis and hemp include:

  1. Regulatory Submissions and Licenses
  2. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)
  3. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)
  4. Food Safety Programs
  5. Gap Analysis and Audits
  6. Extraction and Production Processes
  7. Lab Safety and Hazardous Materials Handling
  8. Advanced Formulations
  9. Supplier and Vendor Qualification
  10. New Product Development
  11. Analytical Test Method and Laboratory Development,
  12. Materials Testing & Certificates of Analysis
  13. Operations, Facilities, Staffing & Training
  14. Investor Due Diligence
  15. Risk Assessment, Prevention & Management



Dietary Supplement Label Review Checklist

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has specific rules for labeling and claims related to dietary supplements on packaging, marketing, websites, inserts and other promotional materials. If a label states a false or misleading claim, FDA, other regulatory agencies or class-action attorneys may file warning letters or lawsuits.

Dietary Supplement Label Review Checklist

⊗ PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS

Five general requirements for labels include: 1) the statement of identity (name of the dietary supplement), 2) the net quantity of contents statement (amount of the dietary supplement), 3) the nutrition labeling (Supplement Facts Panel), 4) the ingredient list, and 5) the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor.

⊗ LABEL STATEMENTS

You must place all required label statements either on the front label panel (the principal display panel) or on the information panel (usually the label panel immediately to the right of the principal display panel, as seen by theconsumer when facing the product), unless otherwise specified by regulation(i.e., exemptions).

⊗ SUPPLEMENT FACTS PANEL

Total calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, totalcarbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugars, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, andiron must be listed when they are present in measurable amounts. Calories from saturated fat and the amount of polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, soluble fiber, insoluble fiber, sugar alcohol, and other carbohydrate may be declared, but they must be declared when a claim is made about them.

⊗ INGREDIENT LIST

When present, you must place the ingredient list on dietary supplementsimmediately below the nutrition label, or if there is insufficient space belowthe nutrition label, immediately contiguous and to the right of the
nutrition label.

⊗ WARNING STATEMENT

FDA requires warning statements related to safety and special precautions that, if not followed, could make the product unsafe.

⊗ UNITS OF MEASUREMENT

Proper units of measurement must be used, for example milligrams (mg), micrograms (mcg) or other appropriate units

⊗ PERCENTAGE DAILY VALUE (DV)

The % DV must be declared for all dietary ingredients for which FDA has established Daily Values, except that 1) the percent for protein may be omitted, and 2) on the labels of dietary supplements to be used by infants, children less than 4 years of age, or pregnant or lactating women, you must not list any percent for total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, total carbohydrate,dietary fiber, vitamin K, selenium, manganese, chromium, molybdenum,chloride, sodium, or potassium.

⊗ DOMESTIC ADDRESS OR PHONE NUMBER

The label of a dietary supplement being marketed in the United States must include a domestic address or domestic phone number through which the responsible person may receive a report of a serious adverse event with such dietary supplement. If the label does not include the required domestic address or phone number, the dietary supplement is misbranded.

⊗ UPC BAR CODE

The UPC bar code may be obtained from the Uniform Code Council (www.uc-council.org)

⊗ NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS

You must declare these ingredients in ingredient lists by using either specific common or usual names or by using the declarations  “natural flavor” or “artificial flavor,” or any combination thereof.

⊗ CHEMICAL PRESERVATIVES

You must list the common or usual name of the preservative, which may be followed by a description that explains its function e.g., “preservative,” “to retard spoilage,”“a mold inhibitor,” “to help protect flavor,” or “to promote color retention.”

⊗ OTHER DIETARY INGREDIENTS

You must list “other dietary ingredients” by common or usual name in acolumn or linear display. FDA has not specified an order that you must follow. You must list the quantitative amount by weight per serving immediately following the name of the dietary ingredient or in a separate column. You must place a symbol in the column for “% Daily Value” that refers to the footnote “Daily Value Not Established,” except that the symbol must follow the weight when you do not use the column format.

⊗ LIQUID EXTRACTS

You must list liquid extracts using the volume or weight of the total extract and the condition of the starting material prior to extraction when it was fresh. You may include information on the concentration of the dietary ingredient and the solvent used. The solvent must be identified in either the nutrition label or ingredient list.

⊗ DRIED EXTRACTS

For dietary ingredients that are extracts from which the solvent has been removed, you must list the weights of the dried extracts.

⊗ CONSTITUENTS

You may list constituents of a dietary ingredient indented under the dietary ingredient and followed by their quantitative amounts by weight per serving. You may declare the constituents in a column or in a linear display.

⊗ PROPRIETARY BLENDS

You must identify proprietary blends by use of the term “Proprietary Blend” or an appropriately descriptive term or fanciful name. On the same line, you must list the total weight of all “other dietary ingredients” contained in the blend. Indented underneath the name of the blend, you must list the “other dietary ingredients” in the blend, either in a column or linear fashion, in descending order of predominance by weight. These ingredients should be followed by a symbol referring to the footnote “Daily Value Not Established.”Dietary ingredients having RDIs or DRVs must be listed separately and the individual weights declared.

⊗ PRODUCT CLAIMS

Claims come in four basic varieties:

  • structure/function claims
  • disease claims
  • health claims and qualified health claims
  • content claims

Basically, dietary supplements cannot make “disease” claims (for example: “treats cancer”). Dietary supplements that make disease claims are considered by FDA as drugs.

Dietary supplements can make “structure/function” claims (for example, “calcium builds strong bones”). A structure/function claim describes the product’s role in maintaining the “structure or function of the body,” or “general well-being.”

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) has overlapping jurisdiction with the federal Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), and focuses more on whether advertising is truthful, or false and misleading. Thus, it is important to respect nuanced labeling rules, including those regarding the statement of the identity.

⊗HIGH POTENCY CLAIMS

The regulation states that the term “high potency” may be used in a claim on the label or in labeling to describe individual vitamins or minerals thatare present at 100 percent or more of the Reference Daily Intakes (RDI) per reference amount customarily consumed (21 CFR 101.54(f)(1)(i)). This means a supplement may be labeled as “high potency” for each nutrient(s) that is present at 100% of the RDI per serving.

⊗ ANTIOXIDANT NUTRIENT CONTENT CLAIMS

A claim that describes the level of antioxidant nutrients present in a food is a nutrient content claim and may be used on the label or in the labeling of a food when the conditions of use in the regulation are met (21 CFR 101.54(g)).

The antioxidant nutrient must meet the requirements for nutrient content claims in 21 CFR 101.54.

⊗SUGAR-FREE CLAIMS

A dietary supplement may include claims in labeling such as “sugar free,” “no sugar,” or other claims provided it meets all of the eligibility criteria set forth in the regulation.

Among other requirements, a food must be labeled as “low calorie” or “reduced calorie” or bear a relative claim of special dietary usefulness. However, a dietary supplement that is prohibited from bearing a “low calorie”or “reduced calorie” claim can still use a sugar-free claim provided it meets the “low calorie” requirement in 21 CFR 101.60.

⊗HIGH OR GOOD SOURCE CLAIMS

You may make a “high” claim when your dietary supplement contains atleast 20% of the Daily Value (DV) (i.e. the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) or Daily Reference Value (DRV)) of the nutrient that is the subject of the claim perreference amount customarily consumed. You may make a “good source”claim when your dietary supplement contains 10 to 19% of DV.

⊗ LOW OR FREE-FROM CLAIMS

If a similar dietary supplement is normally expected to contain a nutrient and your dietary supplement is specially processed, altered, formulated, or reformulated as to lower the amount of the nutrient in the food, remove the nutrient in the food, or not include the nutrient, then you are permitted to make a “low” or “free” claim as applicable.

⊗ LOW CALORIE CLAIMS

A “low calorie” claim may not be made on dietary supplements, except when an equivalent amount of a dietary supplement that the labeled dietary supplement resembles and for which it substitutes (e.g., another protein supplement), normally exceeds the definition for “low calorie.”

⊗ QUALIFIED HEALTH CLAIMS

FDA will permit the use of a qualified health claim provided that 1) FDA hasissued a letter stating the conditions under which we will consider exercisingenforcement discretion for the specific health claim, 2) the qualified claim is accompanied by an agency-approved disclaimer, and 3) the claim meets all the general requirements for health claims in 21 CFR 101.14, except forthe requirement that the evidence for the claim meet the validity standard for authorizing a claim, and the requirement that the claim be made in accordance with an authorizing regulation.

This guidance was prepared by the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary Supplements (ONPLDS) in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Further reading:

Article: Food and Supplement Claims with Confidence

Food and Supplement Testing for Natural Products

Dietary Supplement Facts and Label Review FAQ

Dietary Supplement and Food Label Review

 

 




Dietary Supplement Facts and Label Review


There’s a lot of detail required for dietary supplement labels. Between supplement facts, structure-function health claims, and required formatting, it’s easy to overlook some of the FDA requirements for labeling.

 

Supplement Label Review Nutrition Facts

Supplement Label Review for Supplement Facts, Nutrition Labeling and Claims

Dietary Supplement Facts and Label Review

As part of our Label Review services, NaturPro helps clients develop, review and suggest improvements to dietary supplement labels, to ensure compliance with FDA regulatory requirements

Our clients enjoy the following benefits:

  1. Reliability: 100% accuracy and FDA compliance
  2. Experience: 15+ years of experience reviewing supplement labels
  3. Science-driven: Our reviews are based on the most current, reliable information, techniques and evidence
  4. Perspective: We have experience on the business side of the industry, so we know what the law is, whether it’s followed, and what is likely to happen if you don’t.

Updated 2018 Pricing:

Label Review: $400-600 ea. (Volume discounts may apply for similarly labeled products.)

Marketing Review: Contact for Pricing

Contact Us for a Free Estimate


FDA Dietary Supplement Labeling Guidelines

See our Dietary Supplement Label Review Checklist.

The following outlines some of the most frequently asked questions (FAQ) for dietary supplement labels:

  1. How are dietary supplements defined?Dietary supplements are defined, in part, as products (other than tobacco) intended to supplement the diet that bear or contain one or more of the following dietary ingredients:
    1. A vitamin;
    2. A mineral;
    3. An herb or other botanical;
    4. An amino acid;
    5. A dietary substance for use by man to supplement the diet by increasing the total dietary intake; or
    6. A concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or a combination of any ingredient mentioned above.Further, dietary supplements are products intended for ingestion, are not represented for use as a conventional food or as a sole item of a meal or the diet, and are labeled as dietary supplements.
  2.  What label statements are required on the containers and packages of dietary supplements?Five statements are required: 1) the statement of identity (name of the dietary supplement), 2) the net quantity of contents statement (amount of the dietary supplement), 3) the nutrition labeling, 4) the ingredient list, and 5) the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor.
  3.  Where do I place the required label statements?You must place all required label statements either on the front label panel (the principal display panel) or on the information panel (usually the label panel immediately to the right of the principal display panel, as seen by the consumer when facing the product), unless otherwise specified by regulation (i.e., exemptions).
  4.  What label statements must I place on the principal display panel?You must place the statement of identity and the net quantity of contents statement on the principal display panel. Where packages bear alternate principal display panels, you must place this information on each alternate principal display panel.
  5.  How do I locate the principal display panel?The principal display panel of the label is the portion of the package that is most likely to be seen by the consumer at the time of display for retail purchase. Many containers are designed with two or more different surfaces that are suitable for use as the principal display panel. These are alternate principal display panels.
  6.  What label statements must I place on the information panel?You must place the “Supplement Facts” panel, the ingredient list, and the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor on the information panel if such information does not appear on the principal display panel, except that if space is insufficient, you may use the special provisions on the “Supplement Facts” panel in 21 CFR 101.36(i)(2)(iii) and (i)(5). See questions 46 and 56 in Chapter IV for more details.
  7.  Where is the information panel?The information panel is located immediately to the right of the principal display panel as the product is displayed to the consumer. If this panel is not usable, due to package design and construction (e.g. folded flaps), the panel immediately contiguous and to the right of this part may be used for the information panel. The information panel may be any adjacent panel when the top of a container is the principal display panel.
  8.  What name and address must I list on the label of my product?You must list the street address if it is not listed in a current city directory or telephone book, the city or town, the state, and zip code. You may list the address of the principal place of business in lieu of the actual address.
  9.  May I place intervening material on the information panel?No. You may not place intervening material, which is defined as label information that is not required (e.g., UPC bar code), between label information that is required on the information panel.
  10.  What type size, prominence and conspicuousness am I required to use on the principal display panel and the information panel?You are required to use a print or type size that is prominent, conspicuous and easy to read. The letters must be at least one-sixteenth (1/16) inch in height based on the lower case letter “o,” and not be more than three times as high as they are wide, unless you petition for an exemption in accordance with 21 CFR 101.2(f). The lettering must contrast sufficiently (it does not need to be black and white) with the background so as to be easy to read. See Chapter IV for the type size requirements for the nutrition label.
  11.  Do I need to specify the country of origin if my product, or the ingredients in my product, is not from the United States?Yes. Unless excepted by law, the Tariff Act requires that every article of foreign origin (or its container) imported into the United States conspicuously indicate the English name of the country of origin of the article.
  12. What is the nutrition label for a dietary supplement called?The nutrition label for a dietary supplement is called a “Supplement Facts” panel.
    1. You must list dietary ingredients without RDIs or DRVs in the “Supplement Facts” panel for dietary supplements. You are not permitted to list these ingredients in the “Nutrition Facts” panel for foods.
    2. You may list the source of a dietary ingredient in the “Supplement Facts” panel for dietary supplements. You cannot list the source of a dietary ingredient in the “Nutrition Facts” panel for foods.
    3. You are not required to list the source of a dietary ingredient in the ingredient statement for dietary supplements if it is listed in the “Supplement Facts” panel.
    4. You must include the part of the plant from which a dietary ingredient is derived in the “Supplement Facts” panel for dietary supplements. You are not permitted to list the part of a plant in the “Nutrition Facts” panel for foods.
    5. You are not permitted to list “zero” amounts of nutrients in the “Supplement Facts” panel for dietary supplements. You are required to list “zero” amounts of nutrients in the “Nutrition Facts” panel for food.How does “Supplement Facts” differ from “nutrition facts?”The major differences between “Supplement Facts” panel and “Nutrition Facts” panel are as follows:
  13. What information must I list in the “Supplement Facts” panel?You must list the names and quantities of dietary ingredients present in your product, the “Serving Size” and the “Servings Per Container.” However, the listing of “Servings Per Container” is not required when it is the same information as in the net quantity of contents statement. For example, when the net quantity of contents statement is 100 tablets and the “Serving Size” is one tablet, the “Serving Per Container” also would be 100 tablets and would not need to be listed.
  14. How must I display the “Supplement Facts” panel?The “Supplement Facts” nutrition information (referred to as a panel) must be enclosed in a box by using hairlines. The title, “Supplement Facts,” must be larger than all other print in the panel and, unless impractical, must be set full width of the panel. The title and all headings must be bolded to distinguish them from other information.
  15. How must I present the information in the “Supplement Facts” panel?You must present all information using the following:
    1. A single easy-to-read type style;
    2. All black or one color type, printed on a white or neutral contrasting background, whenever practical;
    3. Upper- and lowercase letters, except that you may use all uppercase lettering on small packages (i.e., packages having a total surface area available to bear labeling of less than 12 square inches);
    4. At least one point leading (i.e., space between lines of text); and
    5. Letters that do not touch.

  16. What are the type size requirements for the “Supplement Facts” panel?Except as provided for small and intermediate-sized packages, you must set information other than the title, headings, and footnotes in uniform type size no smaller than 8 point. You also must use a type size larger than all other print size in the nutrition label for the title “Supplement Facts.” You may set the column headings and footnotes in type no smaller than 6 point type. See the section on “Special Labeling Provisions” for the exceptions for small and intermediate-sized packages.
    For more information, visit FDA Dietary Supplement Labeling Guide

Food & Supplement Testing for Natural Products


Testing Foods, Supplements and Ingredients

NaturPro offers independent laboratory support for food & supplement testing for natural products.

Have natural product analysis questions? Contact Us..

Why Testing is Important: Supplement and natural product testing with a compliant laboratory is required by FDA for foods, dietary supplements and ingredients to ensure they meet standards for safety, quality and effectiveness. For example, identity, potency and purity are quality control parameters needed to legally sell a natural product as an ingredient, food or dietary supplement.

NaturPro Scientific is driven to achieve the right answers for our clients.  Some have even called us the UnLab. Why?

Being independent means that we do not own or have interest in any laboratory, which means we are free to pick from the top scientific experts for each type of test or analysis. As a result, we are truly able to work on behalf of our clients, to ensure that correct methods are used and results are obtained.


Natural Product and Supplement Testing Consultants

Natural Product and Supplement Testing Consultants

We know which labs are experienced with ginseng, but not with ginkgo — and this can mean a world of difference in test results.


11 reasons to use a supplement testing consultant for natural products:

  1. To ensure analytical methods used are valid and fit for purpose
  2. To make sure laboratories don’t take shortcuts with your sample
  3. To determine if results are precise and accurate
  4. To replicate the results of another lab
  5. To resolve out-of-specification test results
  6. To resolve disputes in data reports
  7. To determine if “dry-labbing” may be occurring
  8. To have an independent expert to review methods and results
  9. To perform due diligence on a supplier or partner
  10. To eliminate the potential for perceived conflict of interest when testing own products
  11. To qualify a lab as a good partnership choice.

3 main benefits of food and natural products testing consultants:

  1. Better analysis and testing validity  for reliable, replicable and defensible results.
  2. Fast turnaround and lower testing costs.
  3. Reduced retesting, rejections, production delays and product recalls.

Bottom Line – NaturPro knows the right methods and labs to use, and the right questions to ask. We know the shortcuts that testing labs can take, and how to prevent that from happening to you, to ensure testing gives the most scientific, accurate and defensible results possible.

 

 

 


Contact Us with your Testing Questions




AOAC ERP of the Year to Kombucha Alcohol Group

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

NaturPro Contributes to Expert Panel Receiving AOAC Award: “ERP of the Year” to Kombucha Alcohol Group

The AOAC Expert Review Panel (ERP) charged with reviewing methods of analysis for ethanol in kombucha initially met in September 2016 to review methods against AOAC SMPR 2016.001 (Determination of Ethanol in Kombucha). At this meeting, the ERP adopted an Official Method of Analysis for First Action status, AOAC 2016.12 (Determination of Ethanol in Kombucha) using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The selection and validation of this method was coordinated by NaturPro Scientific and performed by Covance Laboratories, Wisconsin.

kombucha tea testing alcohol ethanol

Method adopted for kombucha tea testing for alcohol in validated labs

AOAC states: “The ERP’s work directly impacts the resolution of urgent and key issues identified by industry, and serves as a forum where both the kombucha industry and government work together.

“The ERP was selected because its open and thorough scientific scrutiny of methods and its output clearly demonstrate the culmination of an industry-wide effort that facilitates regulatory and industry engagement for addressing urgent analytical disputes and facilitating trade. All ERP members receive the award, and publicly receiving the award on behalf of the group is the ERP chair, Sneh Bhandari.

“The Expert Review Panel (ERP) of the Year Award recognizes an ERP for achieving and completing signicant milestone(s) (e.g., Final report, First Action Method, Final Action Method), highlighted by some unique or particularly noteworthy aspect of a review panel report, such as innovative technology or application, breadth of applicability, critical need, difficult analysis, or timeliness.

“The report demonstrates significant merit as to the scope of the project, diversity of the panel, or an innovative approach to difficult analytical challenges. The report must have been submitted within the last 3 years.”

 

 

Dietary Supplement Testing and Analysis: Quality Control

by NaturPro in Uncategorized Comments: 0

Dietary Supplement Testing and Analysis: Quality Control

Dietary supplements are subject to FDA requirements for good manufacturing practices (cGMP) and quality control in the United States. cGMP require specifications for each ingredient and finished dietary supplement. The specifications list parameters for identity, purity, potency and other requirements for regulatory compliance. Each parameter on the specification must be tested with a scientifically valid method.

NaturPro Scientific, as an UnLab, partners with expert analytical laboratories to conduct specific testing on dietary supplements. Testing typically includes:

  • Physical characteristics (visual, color, odor, taste, density, mesh size)
  • Identity (matching an ingredient in a pass/fail fashion to a particular species of botanical or herb, or a chemical purity test)
  • Potency (concentration of active or marker compounds)
  • Purity (absence of impurities such as moisture, microbiology, pathogens, heavy metals, residual solvents, pesticides, mycotoxins)

The following are analytical principles or instruments that may be used for dietary supplement testing:

  • Karl Fischer
  • Ro-tap and particle size analysis
  • Titration
  • Gravimetry
  • Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC or HP-TLC)
  • High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)
  • Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID)
  • Gas Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS of GC-MS-MS)
  • Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)
  • Total Aerobic Plate Count
  • Pathogens (Salmonella, E. Coli, Staph)

The following is a list of documentation and regulations requiring testing under cGMPs:

  • Documentation of the specifications established (21 CFR 111.95(b)(1))
  • Documentation of your qualification of a supplier for the purpose of relying on the supplier’s certificate of analysis (21 CFR 111.95(b)(2))
  • Documentation for why meeting in-process specifications, in combination with meeting component specifications, helps ensure that the dietary supplement meets the specifications for identity, purity, strength, and composition; and for limits on those types of contamination that may adulterate or may lead to adulteration of the finished batch of the dietary supplement (21 CFR 111.95(b)(3))
  • Documentation for why the results of appropriate tests or examinations for the product specifications that you selected for testing ensure that the dietary supplement meets all product specifications (21 CFR 111.95(b)(4))
  • Documentation for why any component and in-process testing, examination, or monitoring, and any other information, will ensure that a product specification that is exempted under 21 CFR 111.75(d) is met without verification through periodic testing of the finished batch, including documentation that the selected specifications tested or examined under 21 CFR 111.75 (c)(1) are not able to verify that the production and process control system is producing a dietary supplement that meets the exempted product specification and there is no scientifically valid method for testing or examining such exempted product specification at the finished batch stage (21 CFR 111.95(b)(5))

There are a number of sources of information for developing specifications and test methods for analysis of dietary supplements. The below is a partial list of references and resources:

  1. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, https://dietarysupplementdatabase.usda.nih.gov/
  2. Dietary Supplement Label Database, https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/DietarySupplements-HealthProfessional/
  3. Dietary supplement laboratory quality assurance program: the first five exercises. Phillips MM, Rimmer CA, Wood LJ, Lippa KA, Sharpless KE, Duewer DL, Sander LC, Betz JM.  J AOAC Int 2011;94:803-14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3173719/
  4. Heavy metals: analysis and limits in herbal dietary supplements, http://www.naturalhealthresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/09_1214_AHPA_Heavy-Metals-White-Paper-Revised.pdf
  5. Pesticide Analytical Manual, Vol I, FDA. Source: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ucm113702.pdf
  6. Pesticide Analytical Manual, Vol II, FDA. Source: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ucm113721.pdf
  7. Quality assurance of cultivated and gathered medicinal plants. Mathe and Mathe, Source: http://www.mtk.nyme.hu/fileadmin/user_upload/kornyezet/Mathe/Quality_assurance.pdf
  8. Quality control methods for medicinal plant materials (1998) World Health Organization
  9. Recommendations for microbial limits in herbal products, American Herbal Products Association, http://www.ahpa.org/Portals/0/PDFs/Policies/14_0206_AHPA_micro_limits_comparisons.pdf
  10. Standardization of herbal medicines – A review. Kunle O.F. et al, (2012) Int. J Biodiv and Conserv. 4(3) 101-112. Source: http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380017716_Kunle%20et%20al.pdf
  11. USP Food Fraud Mitigation Guidance, http://www.usp.org/food/food-fraud-mitigation-guidance